Saturday, November 30, 2013

Why Do You Do Genealogy #3


The Library IS open, today, our normal hours 9-5.

We hope you had a nice Thanksgiving Holiday.

 

 

 

 

Genealogy tip for today:  Why Do You Do Genealogy #3 – Blood Line

Yes, just why do you do genealogy? It’s a big waste of time and money; and just an amusing hobby, nothing serious. Right?

Here’s another reason why folks research their ancestors – establish their blood line. Some folks are looking for their birthparents. Many times I've heard the stories of adoptees, even when raised by loving parents, feel a disconnect and wonder where do they really fit in? One way to find out is to find their bloodline. In doing so, they use elements of genealogy to trace back to parents and beyond.

Proof of Paternity, maybe even Maternity is another reason for researching your genealogy. You’re the parent or assumed parent and you want to prove or disprove that blood line. Again it's the skills and resources of genealogy that are used for this.

With DNA, it gives a modern twists to this situation. When a child had been kidnapped and 20 years later he or she “shows up,” they don't look the same. How else are you going to know for sure that the victim has been reunited with the right family without using some knowledge and understanding how to research your family history?

Maybe your family life took a slightly different path and you have someone who has left home “never to be heard of again” – and you are trying to find or reconnect with that person. You have to be part “detective” when you work in genealogy. But the rewards are what make it all worthwhile.

Do you have an odd crooked finger? Or a dimple in your chin? Maybe you have a knack for drawing and no one in your immediate family can draw a straight line with a ruler (as my Mom used to say). When doing genealogy you just may find where some of your characteristics, traits, features or talents come from.

Here’s an example. I have written poetry most of my life, since I was a teenager. My maternal grandmother did a little bit of that as well as some other creative things that I do. So I just assumed I got it from her. When I researched my Dad’s side of the family, I discovered that his grandfather was quite the poet and even published. Today I have those manuscripts and treasure reading the poems he wrote and reading them in his own handwriting. Now I know I get the “bent” from both sides of my family.

Next week we’ll consider other reasons why folks do genealogy: solve mysteries, prove special connections; research possessions and more.
 

If any of these posts are helpful drop us a line in the comments section below. We just want to know if the information we provide to you is helpful in anyway.

 


 

1782
 
The British sign a preliminary agreement in Paris, recognizing American independence. (see picture above.)
1838
 
Mexico declares war on France.
1861
 
The British Parliament sends to Queen Victoria an ultimatum for the United States, demanding the release of two Confederate diplomats who were seized on the British ship Trent.
1864
 
The Union wins the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee.
1900
 
The French government denounces British actions in South Africa, declaring sympathy for the Boers.
1900
 
Oscar Wilde dies in a Paris hotel room after saying of the room's wallpaper: "One of us had to go."
1906
 
President Theodore Roosevelt publicly denounces segregation of Japanese schoolchildren in San Francisco.
1919
 
Women cast votes for the first time in French legislative elections.
1935
 
Non-belief in Nazism is proclaimed grounds for divorce in Germany.
1945
 
Russian forces take Danzig in Poland and invade Austria.
1948
 
The Soviet Union complete the division of Berlin, installing the government in the Soviet sector.
1950
 
President Truman declares that the United States will use the A-bomb to get peace in Korea.
1956
 
The United States offers emergency oil to Europe to counter the Arab ban.
1961
 
The Soviet Union vetoes a UN seat for Kuwait, pleasing Iraq.
1974
 
India and Pakistan decide to end a 10-year trade ban.
1974
 
Pioneer II sends photos back to NASA as it nears Jupiter.
1979
 
Pope John Paul II becomes the first pope in 1,000 years to attend an Orthodox mass.
1981
 
Representatives of the US and USSR meet in Geneva, Switzerland, to begin negotiations on reducing the number of intermediate-range nuclear weapons in Europe.
1982
 
Thriller, Michael Jackson's second solo album, released; the album, produced by Quincy Jones, became the best-selling album in history.
1993
 
US President Bill Clinton signs the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act (better known as the Brady Bill) into law.
1994
 
MS Achille Lauro, a ship with long history of problems including a 1985 terrorist hijacking, catches fire off the coast of Somalia.
1995
 
Operation Desert Storm officially comes to an end.
1998
 
Exxon and Mobil oil companies agree to a $73.7 billion merge, creating the world's largest company, Exxon-Mobil.
2004
 
On the game show Jeopardy! contestant Ken Jennings loses after 74 consecutive victories. It is the longest winning streak in game-show history, earning him a total of over $3 million.
2005
 
John Sentamu becomes Archbishop of York, making him the Church of England's first black archbishop.
 
 


1667
 
Jonathan Swift, English satirist who wrote Gulliver's Travels.
1835
 
Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens), American writer best remembered for The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
1874
 
Winston Churchill, British prime minister during and after World War II.
1874
 
Lucy Maud Montgomery, author of Anne of Green Gables.
1912
 
Gordon Parks, photographer.
1915
 
Brownie McGhee, singer and guitarist.
1924
 
Shirley Chisholm, first African-American congresswoman, a representative for New York.
1929
 
Joan Ganz Cooney, television executive, founder of the Children's Television Workshop and mastermind behind Sesame Street.
1929
 
Dick Clark, television host; (American Bandstand, 1957-87; Pyramid game show); beginning in 1972 and continuing into the 21st century he hosted Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve on television.
1930
 
G. Gordon Liddy, chief operative for the "White House Plumbers" (July-September 1971) during Richard Nixon's administration, he organized and oversaw the Watergate burglaries of the Democratic National Committee headquarters. He served nearly 52 months in federal prison.
1936
 
Abbie Hoffman, political and social activist; co-founded the Youth International Party (Yippies); he became a symbol of the counterculture era.
1937
 
Sir Ridley Scott, English film director and producer; (Blade Runner, Thelma & Louise) won a Best Picture Oscar for Gladiator (2000).
1955
 
Billy Idol (William Broad), punk rock musician; member of Generation X band.
1962
 
Bo Jackson, the only pro athlete to be named an All-Star in two major American sports (football and baseball); ESPN named him the greatest athlete of all time.

 

 


blimp


PRONUNCIATION:

(blimp)

 

MEANING:

noun: A pompous reactionary with out-of-date views.

 

ETYMOLOGY:

After Colonel Blimp, a cartoon character created by David Low (1891-1963). Blimp was a satirical look at the self-important and ultra-nationalistic attitudes of officials in the British army and government. Earliest documented use: 1934.

 

USAGE:

"Yet, far from being a blimp, Charles Napier was one of the most impressive and intelligent individuals the British armed forces have ever produced."
Frank McLynn; The Road Not Taken; Random House; 2012.



Quote for the Day
The great thing about getting older is that you don't lose all the other ages you've been. -Madeleine L'Engle, writer (1918-2007)

 

 

Today’s Recipe

Holiday Cooking

 101cookbooks.com

Vanilla Mashed Sweet Potatoes

(for the vegetarian)

 

This vanilla mashed sweet potato recipe has been cast in a regular role on our Thanksgiving table, but is great the rest of the season as well. I'll take this version over the one showered with marshmallows any day. He re's what you're in for: plump vanilla beans, cream, orange zest, and butter combined with sweet potatoes that have been roasted in the oven until they develop a beautiful, rich, flavor-concentrated flesh. A quick whirl in the food processor produces a smooth, creamy, subtly sweet puree haunted by the delicious vanilla and citrus undertones. The consistency was that of a thick frosting. You can also use the puree as a base for other recipes:

- thin it out with some vegetable stock for an autumn soup.
- add an egg or two, maybe some grated cheese for a tart filling.
- yum. Sweet potato raviolis.
- wrapped in phyllo or puff pastry dough.

I topped the sweet potatoes with the Autumn Spice Oil: A bunch of spices including juniper berries, cardamom, star anise, cinnamon, cloves - toasted, freshly ground, and bathed in warm oil. I hope you enjoy this one as much as we have!

 

 

ENJOY!

 

Now You Know!